Skip to main content

6 Tips For Your First Jab At Creative Writing


The world of creative writing is an ever expanding one as stories or genres continue to evolve in a natural reaction to the changes in time. Having confirmed writing skills, however, is not enough to succeed in creative writing. Having passion for it is more important than having technical expertise. Love for creative writing, and not adherence to the grammatical elements, is what will ultimately guide you to doing things properly and successfully.

6 Tips for Your First Jab at Creative Writing

Don’t Stop Reading – It’s impossible to become a writer, much less a creative writer, without being a reader first. Discovering your love for writing shouldn’t stop you from further devouring reading materials but should instead encourage you to diversify your taste. If you want to become good in creative writing, you need to broaden your horizons. Don’t limit yourself to reading one genre because this can only provide you with limited knowledge. If you want to improve, read everything that you can get your hands on.

Don’t Stop Learning – You can ask Stephen King, Danielle Steele, Dan Brown, and JK Rowling, and all of them will surely tell you that they’re not perfect writers and will never be. No one can be perfect in any way, and if you allow your writing to stagnate, readers will soon get bored with your work. Of course, before you can continue learning about creative writing, you first have to acknowledge the fact that your writing is definitely imperfect. Get past your ego if you want to be a successful creative writer.

Choosing a Topic – You’ve heard countless people tell you that to be a successful writer, you need to write about you know, and that’s true. But more importantly than that, you have to write about something you love or something you hate, just as long as it’s a topic that arouses passion in your heart and brings your pen aflame! If you find something that interests you but you don’t have adequate knowledge about then research it by all means! Research, research, and research, until you can safely say that you’re writing something you know and love.

Build Your Vocabulary – True enough, Ernest Hemingway earned fame by using poignantly – but sometimes brutally – simple words for narrating events in his stories. But building your vocabulary surely wouldn’t hurt, would it? Broadening your vocabulary and discovering its etymology can be one of the ways for you to develop a story idea or an effective way of setting the tone or mood for a particular chapter. But more important than that, building your vocabulary will reduce the instances when you can’t just quite say the word you want but it’s already in the tip of your tongue.

Don’t Let It Get Away – If an idea suddenly occurs to you, and it seems excellent for a future story, write it down. If you’re walking down the street and you suddenly think of a good dialogue for your characters, write it down. Don’t let anything get away because the human mind is a tricky thing, and it might be impossible for you to recall exactly what occurred to you just three minutes ago. Good story ideas are a dime in a dozen, but great ideas are definitely few, and who knows if what you’ve written down will one day become one of the latter?

And last but not the least, NEVER STOP WRITING. Don't make publication of your work the ends and means for your writing. Write because you love to write!

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Top 10 [FREE] Writing Courses on Youtube That Are Packed With Massive Value

This is a friendly reminder that the best things in life really are FREE, and that includes full spectrum writing courses on Youtube that teach you just about everything you will need to know about operating as a competent, reliable, and skilled copywriter. Sure, you could pay for courses and there's nothing wrong with that. But why not take advantage of a free opportunity? Here are  Top 20 [FREE] Writing Courses on Youtube That Are Packed With Massive Value. 1. Simple Learning's Copywriting Course In this course, writers will learn how to write write product descriptions, multiply sales, and how to influence your readers. Course contains very little fluff - only the most important principles are shared throughout the video.  2. Simplilearn's Full Course Content Marketing Tutorial For Beginners Every content writer and marketer wants that coveted #1 spot on Google. Heck, most want to get to the front page at the very least. This course is all about ranking high on Google an

How To Get People To Know That Your Book Is Out There

Ok, so you wrote that perfect novel, and rewrote it again and again until it's perfect.  Then you found either a Publisher or Agent to represent you.  Your book has been through the editing stage, cover art finalized, and a published Date assigned, now what?  Is the job done?  Have you did all you needed to do to make this book a success?  Nope, you have only begun.  Now you have to market that book, get  it into book stores, let people know it is available.  First off, you need to find out from your Publisher or Agent where you book will be available, who is doing reviews and any promoting they plan on doing.  Once you have the answers to these questions you now know where to start.  A review is the first step to getting your book known.  You can begin requesting reviews as soon as the Publisher has a final proof copy available.  Most review sites can be found in the Search Engines by simply typing the genre of your book. Examples includes romance and sci-fi, and book r

How to Multiply Your Freelance Work

You can turn your $200 fee to write a press release into $2,000 to  carry out an entire PR campaign simply by convincing clients to  invest in campaigns, instead of individual assignments. Campaigns  achieve better results and cost less in the long-term for clients, compared to individual assignments. And, of course, as the  freelancer, you get paid much more for turning out a succession of  assignments that assimilate a successful campaign. Here's how to multiply your writing sales by convincing clients to  invest in long-term campaigns, instead of short-term individual  assignments. • Know the short-term and long-term results. A client approaches you to write a brochure. He may or may not know that his product can  also benefit from other types of promotional pieces, such as ads,  direct mail, news releases, websites, and so on, to sell his product  or service. Your job is to educate the client. The brochure may be  the first promotional piece in a consortium of promotion